Walking the Dog, an Adventure Story

Walking the Dog, an Adventure Story
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It’s 7 in the morning, and it’s raining cats and dogs. I need to walk our dog and the thought of it is not very appealing. We live in a condo, so this activity requires getting dressed, squatting down to feed Joey, squatting again to get him hooked up with his leash, getting my rain gear on and going down the elevator. Not a big deal for most folks, but a little bit of a bigger deal for someone like me, who has MS.

I don’t actually walk Joey. He trots alongside me as I ride my scooter. We’ve gotten pretty good at doing this, but the elevator can be a bit of a challenge, as can meeting up with most other dogs. Joey, who is a cocker spaniel, likes people more than he likes most dogs. (If you’re a certain age, you may appreciate the Joe Cocker connection.) He also likes to be the boss. (Not to be confused with The Boss.)

In the rain, it’s a bit of a challenge to get off the scooter with my cane, have his leash in one hand and the poop bag in the other – especially if there’s another dog around. I give myself extra points for completing the poop pickup if the wind is strong, which it often is here at the ocean.

Anyway, it’s not easy having a dog or, for that matter, a cat (more about the cat shortly). So I was surprised when I was contacted by a writer for another website who was putting together an article about the benefits that accrue to someone with a disability who lives with a pet. Benefits? Let me think about that and get back to you.

Meanwhile, let me introduce you to TJ. TJ. is a retired grand champion show cat, and he knows it. Like most cats, TJ thinks it’s great fun to plop down in front of me as I’m walking – not such a good thing to do to a guy who walks with two canes. He tries to nibble my ankles when I’m sitting – a dangerous thing to do to a guy who has a cane. I accidentally stepped on his tail one day with my bad leg. For a very long five seconds I couldn’t move and he couldn’t move, but we each managed to escape uninjured. Of course, as with all cats, there’s also kitty litter. Need I say more?

Yes, I eventually told that writer, there are benefits to having a pet for someone with a disability. There’s never-ending companionship, at least with the dog. There’s that friendly greeting when you get home (dog only) and the piercing howl when you leave. There’s the warm body curled up next to you at night, leaving you about two feet of room in a king-sized bed (mostly dog, but the cat can get pushy).

And, if you put Joey and TJ together, the result can sometimes be some great entertainment:

So, back to the original question. What are the benefits of having a pet to someone with a disability? As far as I can see, the benefits are no different from the benefits for someone who’s healthy! And, they’re usually worth an occasional walk in the rain.

(You’re invited to follow my personal blog: www.themswire.com.)

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Chris Comish serves as the Publisher of the website, and is responsible for directing the editorial focus as well as putting the finishing touches on many featured articles.