Lacking Employment, College Education Negatively Impacts Hemophilia Patients, Study Finds

Lacking Employment, College Education Negatively Impacts Hemophilia Patients, Study Finds
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Being unemployed or under-educated can have a negative effect on hemophilia patients’ quality of life, including their pain levels and ability to function, according to the results of a questionnaire that were presented at the ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition.

In the patients surveyed, increased pain, functional impairment and reduced quality of life were associated with aging, having a history of joint procedures, viral disease, co-morbidities, being unemployed and lacking college education.

The presentation of the study abstract, titled “Linear and Logistic Regression Models of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Patient Characteristics in US Adults with Hemophilia from the Pain, Functional Impairment, and Quality of Life (P-FiQ) Study,” was made in December.

Katherine Batt, MD, of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and study leader, and colleagues administered several patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires to 381 adult mild-to-severe hemophilic patients with a history of joint pain or bleeding, in order to assess pain, functional impairment and quality of life.

Patients were asked to complete a pain history questionnaire and to respond to five PRO measurements: EQ-5D-5L with visual analog scale (VAS), Brief Pain Inventory v2 Short Form (BPI), International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), SF-36v2 overall health, and Hemophilia Activities List (HAL).

The team used additional data from the Pain, Functional Impairment and Quality of Life (P-FIQ) study and, through statistical methods, determined associations between patient characteristics and responses to PRO instruments.

According to the findings, 68% of the participants had employment and 61% had university degrees. About 71% of patients had severe hemophilia and 50% reported a history of joint procedures.

Moreover, 85% of the patients reported experiencing pain and 67% felt restricted at school, work and during recreational activities during the previous six months.

The most common co-morbidities and viral diseases were found to include Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 32% of patients, depression in 19%, cardiovascular disease in 19%, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in 16%, anxiety in 14% and diabetes in 6% of patients.

Having a history of joint procedures, viral diseases, co-morbidities and severe hemophilia was linked to functional impairment (as measured by HAL).

Moreover, having a history of joint procedures, viral disease and comorbidities was linked to a reduction in physical activity, as measured by IPAQ.

Having a history of joint procedures, viral disease, co-morbidities, lack of college education and unemployment was linked to pain severity, as determined by BPI.

Overall health state, as measured by EQ-5D-5L with VAS, was associated with having a history of joint procedures, viral disease, co-morbidities, and no current or past history of inhibitors, as well as a lack of college education, unemployment and older age.

Finally, having a history of routine factor infusions, younger age, no co-morbidities, severe hemophilia and employment was linked to overall health, as measured by SF-36v2.

“We identified sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities potentially associated with PRO measurements,” Batt said at the oral presentation, according to a press release. “Measuring PRO during clinical encounters may facilitate monitoring the impact of patient characteristics on important health outcomes.”

The post Lacking Employment, College Education Negatively Impacts Hemophilia Patients, Study Finds appeared first on Hemophilia News Today.

Carolina holds a BSc in Anthropology and a MSc in Urban Studies., and brings her interdisciplinary skills to her writing on a range of different topics in science, research and advocacy news.